GD11.1, April 2021

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Editorial of Global Dialogue 11.1

At the time this issue of Global Dialogue was being edited the US elections were one of the main topics in the media around the globe. In the meantime, we know that they have led to a post-Trump era but this does not mean that the problems witnessed by the US in the last years […]

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The Brilliance of BLM. An Interview with Dr. S.M. Rodriguez

Dr. S.M. Rodriguez (Samar Rodriguez-Fairplay; pronouns: they/their) is Assistant Professor of Criminology and Director, LGBTQ+ Studies at Hofstra University, Department of Sociology. They are the author of the book, The Economies of Queer Inclusion: Transnational Organizing for LGBTI Rights in Uganda (2019), in which Rodriguez provides a nuanced analysis of the implications of transnational organizing […]

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What Might be Done about the United States?

by Peter Evans, University of California, Berkeley, USA, and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02), Labour Movements (RC44), and Social Classes and Social Movements (RC47) Since the mid-twentieth century, the trajectory of the United States has been emblematic of the global evolution of capitalism. Is the US still a harbinger of […]

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Deaths of Despair and the Health of Democracy: Challenges for Sociology

by Gabor Scheiring, Bocconi University, Italy, and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02), Social Transformations and Sociology of Development (RC09), Sociology of Health (RC15) and Political Sociology (RC18) The coronavirus pandemic helped temporarily slow populism’s rise and relieve the pressure on status quo politics, contributing to Joe Biden’s victory in the […]

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Human Capitalists

by Christopher Muller, University of California, Berkeley, USA and Suresh Naidu, Columbia University, USA The economic devastation wrought by COVID-19, against a background of extreme wealth and income inequality, would seem to be a perfect recipe for a revolutionary situation. Consider the most mechanical economic determinist theories of social mobilization: high structural inequality plus transitory […]

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The Future of Reproductive Justice in the US

by Patricia Zavella, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA Efforts at reproductive governance that monitor and control women’s reproductive behaviors were central to Trump’s policies, buttressed by anti-abortion rhetoric designed to appease his base, especially evangelicals. The attacks on reproductive justice shared political and ideological foundations with parallel attacks on immigrants. Trump pushed an unprecedented […]

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The Fight for Climate Justice and the Biden-Harris Administration

by J. Mijin Cha, Occidental College, USA A second Trump administration would have guaranteed catastrophic climate change, but the prospects for a Green New Deal-type mobilization under a Biden-Harris administration seem dim. President-elect Biden’s commitment to climate action is more aggressive than any previous administration’s, to be clear, but the vision and ambition of the […]

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Radical Reparations

by Marcus Anthony Hunter, UCLA, USA For more than four hundred years, four thousand months, and two hundred million minutes, the United States of America has been living with and in the sin of slavery. Abolished yet alive, as many activists and scholars have demonstrated, slavery in one form or another has persisted and lingered like an […]

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The Changing Place of the Chinese in Europe

by Fanni Beck, Central European University, Hungary, and Pál Nyíri, Vrije University Amsterdam, Netherlands In 1998, an edited volume on the Chinese in Europe identified several successive waves of ethnic Chinese immigration to Europe: small traders from Zhejiang Province in the early twentieth century; colonial migrants from Hong Kong and adjacent areas in the mid-twentieth […]

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From Silence to Action: The Chinese in France

by Ya-Han Chuang, Institut national d’études démographiques (INED), France, Emilie Tran, Hong Kong Baptist University, and Hélène Le Bail, CNRS, CERI-Sciences Po Paris, France As in other Western European countries like the UK and the Netherlands, the history of Chinese communities in France dates back to the beginning of the twentieth century. The early presence […]

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Chinese Students in Europe

by Stig Thøgersen, Aarhus University, Denmark In 1978, Deng Xiaoping announced that China would send from 3,000 to 4,000 students abroad every year to break the country’s scientific isolation and speed up its modernization process. His plan seemed ambitious at the time but he can hardly have imagined the flood wave he started. Today China […]

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Chinese “Golden Visa” Migrants in Budapest

by Fanni Beck, Central European University, Hungary, Eszter Knyihár, Eötvös Lorand University, Hungary, and Linda Szabó, Periféria Policy and Research Center, Hungary With China’s changing position in global capitalism and the reconfiguration of its social structures, an increasing number of urban middle- and upper-class families are moving to a select few countries across the globe. […]

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The Chinese in Italy: Businesses and Identity

by Ting Deng, Population Studies and Training Center, Brown University, USA Yuan was born in Bologna in 1988. He is a third-generation Chinese whose family first arrived in Italy in the 1930s. His first relative to set foot on Italian soil was his grandfather’s brother, who went to Italy with other single men from the […]

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The Changing Status of the Chinese in Serbia

by Jelena Gledić, University of Belgrade, Serbia Relations between the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of Serbia have been growing closer throughout the past decade, bringing about changes in migrant communities and migration trends. The status of the Chinese in Serbia has shifted from undesirable outsiders, necessary during times of economic crises, to […]

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Chinese Migrants and COVID-19 Pandemic

by Martina Bofulin, Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts (ZRC SAZU), Slovenia Pandemic-related racism Shortly after the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 at the beginning of 2020, reports on acts of prejudice, racism, and violence against the Chinese started to multiply worldwide.[1] Chinese were screamed at, attacked, and saw their shops and restaurants […]

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Toward a Comparative Analysis of Far-Right Regimes

by Walden Bello, State University of New York at Binghamton, USA The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered an efflorescence of ideas on how to reorganize society along more progressive lines from the left. In webinars spanning the globe, people have been treated to a dazzling array of alternatives, including a reinvigorated left-wing Keynesianism, degrowth, deglobalization, ecofeminism, […]

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The Universalist Aims of Latin American Sociology

by Esteban Torres, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba-CONICET, Argentina This section of Global Dialogue presents a small sample of theoretical innovations, intellectual itineraries, and future projects from a group of prominent Latin American authors. All of these colleagues work every day to build new theoretical tools for the comprehensive study of Latin America’s social reality and, […]

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The World Paradigm: A New Proposal for Sociology

by Esteban Torres, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba-CONICET, Argentina Major social transformations in world society since the beginning of the twenty-first century are exhausting the two paradigms that governed the development of sociology from its origins until today: the modern paradigm and the anti-modern postmodern paradigm. This issue calls for a paradigm shift. My proposal introduces […]

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Linking Global Sociology with Global Modernity

by José Maurício Domingues, IESP-UERJ, Brazil Political sociology has a strong tradition in Latin America. It has probably been the core strand of Latin American sociology, though certainly not the only one (“culture” has also been important, as well as some older openings to political economy). Political sociology was extended and transformed with the specific […]

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Historicizing Theory: A Proposal for Latin America

by Viviane Brachet-Márquez, El Colegio de México, Mexico In the past, social theory, as practiced in central (as opposed to peripheral) countries has been of a static nature, in the sense of perceiving social order as the absence of widespread conflict, and conflict as evidence of disorder. It has also attempted to become “scientific” by […]

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Rethinking Interdependencies

by Sérgio Costa, Free University of Berlin, Germany Sociology under pressure Since its emergence, sociology has had to constantly prove that its results are useful and different from those of neighboring disciplines. Sociology distinguishes itself by its ability to examine social processes by considering their context of origin as well as the meanings that actors […]

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The Age of Neglect: A Systems Theory of Crises

by Aldo Mascareño, Centro de Estudios Públicos, Chile In the last five years, my work has been focused on developing a systems theory of complex social crises. Either because the concept of crisis remained indissolubly linked to that of critique since the French Revolution, or because critical theory adopted the difference of crisis and critique […]

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Researching Neoliberalism from Latin America

by Verónica Gago, Universidad de Buenos Aires-UNSAM-CONICET, Argentina The investigation that I develop in my book Neoliberalism from Below: Baroque Economies and Popular Pragmatics[1] aims to discuss the notion of neoliberalism, how to historicize it in our region, deepen theoretical debates, and trace genealogies based on struggles, with the goal of challenging the idea that […]

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Towards A Post-Liberal Grammar

by Carmen Ilizarbe, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Peru The most important political phenomenon so far in the twenty-first century is the notorious depletion and decline – maybe even the eclipse – of the liberal understanding of representative democracy. Although the legitimacy crisis of political parties is a widespread occurrence in the world, it is […]

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Scales, Inequalities, and Elites in Latin America

by Mariana Heredia, Universidad Nacional de San Martín-CONICET, Argentina Growing attention and a faddish debate As poverty rates have held firm or even increased, massive fortunes have accumulated, and new political leaderships have emerged to cause institutional strain, elites have again captured the attention of both academics and the public. They are now the target […]

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Primitive Accumulation and the Critique of Law

by Guilherme Leite Gonçalves, Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil In what way are law and the development of capitalism related to one another? This question is often answered first and foremost using the normative schema based on the distinction and friction between capitalism and democracy. Two views emerge from this thesis: Firstly, the available […]

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Introducing Global Dialogue’s Polish Team

Jakub Barszczewski, PhD, teaches sociology at the University of Bialystok. His research interests include critical theories, sociology of the Global South, decolonial thought, counter-hegemonic globalization, and creativity. His doctoral thesis concerned Boaventura de Sousa Santos’ concept of counter-hegemonic globalization. He has published a book about the discourse of creativity in Post-Fordism. Aleksandra Biernacka is a […]

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