GD11.2, August 2021

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Editorial of Global Dialogue 11.2

In this issue of Global Dialogue the section ‘Talking Sociology’ takes up the current developments in Chile. In this interview conducted by Johanna Sittel and Walid Ibrahim, Dasten Julián, a most renowned researcher working in the intersecting fields of sociology and history reflects on political developments, social protests and precarious work in his country, and […]

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Sociology in Moments of Crisis: An Interview with Dasten Julián

Dr. Dasten Julián is an academic and researcher at the Institute of History and Social Sciences, the Austral University of Chile. He is currently working as principal researcher on the project “Precariousness of work in the southern macro-zone of Chile: Intersections, territories and resistance in the Maule, Ñuble, Biobío and La Araucanía regions” (2020-2023) funded […]

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COVID-19 and Global Inequalities

by Karin Fischer, Johannes Kepler University, Austria The coronavirus exempts no one and respects no national borders. According to the UN Development Program, the human development index – a combined measure of education, health, and living standards – is on course to decline for the first time since 1990. The decline is expected across the […]

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People Before Profits: A COVID-19 Clarion Call

by Kajal Bhardwaj, lawyer, New Delhi, India In 2001, the World Trade Organization (WTO) confronted the impact of intellectual property (IP) obligations enshrined in its multilateral agreement, the TRIPS Agreement, on global attempts to address the HIV pandemic. At the time, multinational pharma companies sued South African President Nelson Mandela over legal provisions to allow […]

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COVID-19 Vaccines: Unveiling Global Inequalities

by Camila Gianella, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú-Cisepa, Peru The COVID-19 pandemic is having devastating economic and social effects across the globe. However, one dangerous message that has emerged from this global crisis is that we are facing the same crisis everywhere (we are in the same boat), as if facing a lockdown in Bergen, […]

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Perpetuating Divides Between Creditors and Debtors

by Christina Laskaridis, The Open University, United Kingdom Wealthy countries combat the economic downturn through debt-financed spending and economic stimulus, while low- and middle-income countries in the Global South are caught in an unfolding debt trap. The legacies of colonialism and past geographies of sovereign debt in the Global South are being reinforced in times […]

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Challenges to Reducing Poverty and Inequalities in Africa

by Luckystar Miyandazi, Program Specialist, Tax Inspectors Without Borders, and Coordinator for Africa, UNDP Africa Financial Sector Hub, South Africa Even before the coronavirus disease pandemic hit the globe in March 2020, global inequalities measured by most indicators had been on the rise for decades. The COVID-19 pandemic and its unprecedented consequences in almost all […]

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Twin Disasters in India – An Unfinished Agenda

by E. Venkat Ramnayya and Viha Emandi, Youth For Action, India If and when the pandemic ebbs, life will be far from normal. Human, livelihood, and property loss will be enormous as has been proven in India when people faced the twin disasters of COVID-19 and floods. In 2020, in the midst of COVID-19, India […]

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The Foundational Economy as Key to Social Renewal

by Julie Froud, The University of Manchester, UK, for the Foundational Economy Collective The current pandemic provides a sharp reminder of the importance of the foundational economy – those goods and services consumed on a daily basis that make safe and civilized life possible. These include the pipe and cable network infrastructures that deliver utilities, […]

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Future-Fit Economies and the State

by Andreas Novy and Richard Bärnthaler, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria That we are currently living in times of profound turmoil is widely acknowledged. The question no longer is whether profound changes will take place in the twenty-first century, but how this transformation will happen – in a chaotic way, as we are […]

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COVID-19: New Articulations of State and Economy

by Bob Jessop, Lancaster University, UK The significance of the COVID-19 pandemic is still unfolding. Until the virus is controlled, if not eliminated, we will not fully know which responses worked well. But it is already clear that some countries have been more successful in controlling cases and reducing excess deaths from any cause. It […]

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The Leviathan is Back! Corona State and Sociology

by Klaus Dörre and Walid Ibrahim, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany The Leviathan is back! This is how one could summarize what is currently happening in parts of the world due to the Corona pandemic. In his seminal work, Leviathan, or the Matter, Forme and Power of a Commonwealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil, Thomas Hobbes chose the analogy […]

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COVID-19: The Making of Unsafe Places in Germany

by Daniel Mullis, Peace Research Institute Frankfurt (PRIF), Germany It is “precisely whose or which lives are policed or made safe,” argues Rosemary-Claire Collard, which defines biopolitical calculations. Biopolitics, following Michel Foucault, is politics concerned with the well-being of a population. It is the capability of “making live” and “letting die.” Matthew Hannah, Jan Simon […]

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After Depression: The Post-Neoliberal Subject

by Arthur Bueno, University of Frankfurt, Germany and member of ISA Research Committee on Conceptual and Terminological Analysis (RC35) We live in a time of great transformations. From the financial collapse of 2008 to the wave of political protests that emerged in the following years, from the rise of new far-right movements to the current […]

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The Visual Representation of Invisible Work

by Jenni Tischer, University of Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria As a result of the measures introduced to tackle COVID-19, some of us are experiencing social distancing, distance learning, separation, and isolation in a number of environments. At first glance, it seems as though one can talk about a “we,” “us,” even a collective experience, or […]

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Domestic Violence During the Global Pandemic

by Margaret Abraham, Hofstra University, USA, former President of the ISA (2014-18) and member of ISA Research Committees on Racism, Nationalism, Indigeneity and Ethnicity (RC05), Sociology of Migration (RC31), Women, Gender and Society (RC32), Human Rights and Global Justice (TG03) and Violence and Society (TG11) The fact that there is an increase in domestic violence […]

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The COVID-19 Crisis: New Sociologies and Feminisms

by Karina Batthyány, CLACSO Executive Secretary and Esteban Torres, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba-CONICET, Argentina For the social sciences, the main novelty that the mega-crisis linked to the expansion of COVID-19 has produced is the recognition of the impossibility of ignoring that we live in territorial societies that are increasingly globally interdependent. If, before 2020, social […]

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The Frightening Global Impact of COVID-19

by Mahmoud Dhaouadi, University of Tunis, Tunisia and member of ISA Research Committees on History of Sociology (RC08), Sociology of Religion (RC22), and Language and Society (RC25) By all accounts the coronavirus pandemic is a very unusual worldwide disaster event. It has drawn health specialists to the frontline to reduce the death tolls and the […]

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Post-Pandemic Scenarios, from Adaptation to Collective Learning

by Alejandro Pelfini, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, and FLACSO Argentina, Argentina Although we are still in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects and damages are difficult to calculate, as is the estimation of a date by which it will come under control, the social sciences have not stopped reflecting on possible […]

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Sociologists in the Civic-Political Arena

by Fredy Aldo Macedo Huamán, Universidad Iberoamericana (IBERO), Mexico City, Mexico From the beginning, sociologists were involved in the public affairs of their societies (e.g., Émile Durkheim, Max Weber, Marianne Schnitger and Jane Addams), whether it was to warn wide audiences of the conditions of inequality, discrimination, and misery, as well as the injustices, abuse […]

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Silence around Intimate Partner Violence in Trinidad and Tobago

by Amanda Chin Pang, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago In Trinidad and Tobago (T&T), when women, men, and children are killed in intimate partner violence (IPV) or gang-related warfare, this gets immediate attention. However, immediately, the cries of victims and survivors go silent and perpetrators merely put forward trite alibis […]

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On the Capability to Take Care of the World

by Francesco Laruffa, University of Geneva, Switzerland The COVID-19 pandemic has nourished various discussions on the “world after Corona” and the “future we want.” The idea is that the pandemic is not only a tragic consequence of neoliberal capitalism and its inherent overexploitation of nature (e.g., deforestation): the pandemic also offers the opportunity to rethink […]

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Humans as Homo Culturus

by Mahmoud Dhaouadi, University of Tunis, Tunisia and member of ISA Research Committees on History of Sociology (RC08), Sociology of Religion (RC22) and Language and Society (RC25) The concept of Homo Culturus is missing in the social sciences. Economists and those who have a materialist view have described Man as Homo Oeconomicus, political scientists have […]

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The Norway Terror Attacks of July 22, 2011

by Pål Halvorsen, journals editor at Scandinavian University Press, Norway “Things happen, but their representation is up in the air” Alexander, J. C. & Gao, R. (2012) Fjotolf Hansen, most known by his former name Anders Behring Breivik, conducted two terrorist attacks in Norway on July 22, 2011, one at the executive government quarter of […]

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