GD10.3, December 2020

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Editorial of Global Dialogue 10.3

The section ‘Talking Sociology’ features an interview with the most renowned journalist Robert Kuttner, who reads Karl Polanyi’s work for today. Starting from the political and economic situation at the beginning of the twentieth century the interview discusses current trends in globalization, the need for strong national economies to strengthen democratic decision making, and issues […]

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Surviving Global Capitalism with Karl Polanyi: An Interview with Robert Kuttner

Robert Kuttner is co-founder and co-editor of The American Prospect magazine and Professor at Brandeis University’s Heller School. He was a longtime columnist for Business Week, and for the Washington Post syndicate. He was a founder of the Economic Policy Institute and serves on its board and executive committee. Kuttner is author of twelve books, […]

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Climate Migration in South Asia

by Md. Rezwan Siddiqui, East West University, Bangladesh South Asia (comprised of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Pakistan, Nepal, Maldives, India, and Sri Lanka), with an estimated population of 1.836 billion (almost a quarter of the global population) is one of the world’s most densely populated regions. With rapidly booming economies, steadily improving human development indices, and […]

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The Climate Crisis and the Question of Democracy

by Markus Wissen, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Germany If we think about climate crisis, climate policy, and liberal democracy, first of all there is an eye-catching tension: fighting the climate crisis through effective climate policies seems to be quite difficult under the conditions of liberal democracy. This is underscored by the poor effects […]

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After Capitalism: Democratic Eco-Socialism?

by Vishwas Satgar, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02) and Labour Movements (RC44) In the contemporary carbon-centric lifeworld of capitalism, gas-guzzling automobiles, hi-tech airplanes, massive container ships, and energy-using skyscrapers are weapons of mass destruction. The more these resource-intensive and carbon-centric social relations prevail, […]

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How Urban Climate Action Can Rebuild Communities

by Joan Fitzgerald, Northeastern University, USA The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed two visions of the city. One is the racially and ethnically unjust cities that are the current reality. In US and European cities, death rates from COVID-19 are higher in low-income areas and communities of color. Because they live in neighborhoods that tend to […]

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Charity as Status and Stigma: Lockdown in India

by Mahmudul Hasan Laskar, University of Science and Technology, Meghalaya, India To avert the spread of COVID-19, a nation-wide lockdown was instituted by the government of India. Harsh realities like the hierarchical segregation of the population and the uneven impact of the lockdown have received attention. The loss of jobs and wages due to the […]

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Care Scarcity? Care Migration and Political Demography

by Attila Melegh, Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary Humanity has reached a particular global social situation in the 2010s. Since the 1980s there has been a rather unique interplay between aging, ongoing marketization with no increase in redistribution, and the death of the peasantry. These factors and their historical dynamic have led to care scarcity […]

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Could COVID-19 Lead to the End of Globalization?

by Iliana Olivié and Manuel Gracia, Elcano Royal Institute and Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain The current globalization process, which dates back to the 1970s, includes phases of growth, contraction, and mutation. Many of these correspond to structural changes in the global economic and geopolitical order, including the rise of emerging powers in Asia and […]

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Facing COVID-19: Live-in Care in Central Europe

by Brigitte Aulenbacher, Johannes Kepler University, Austria and member of ISA Research Committee on Economy and Society (RC02), Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy (RC19), Sociology of Work (RC30), and Women, Gender, and Society (RC32); Petra Ezzeddine, Charles University, Czech Republic; Dóra Gábriel, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, Hungary; Michael Leiblfinger, Johannes Kepler University, Austria and […]

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Public Sociology in South Asia During Lockdown

by Dev Nath Pathak, South Asian University, India An opportunity to rethink South Asia in terms of human emotion, suffering, and socio-political crises lapsed once again during the lockdown that was enforced to check the spread of coronavirus across the region. A quick reckoning of the pieces of the drama could help in understanding it. […]

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Public Sociology: Facing the Pandemic

by Michele Grigolo and Craig Lundy, Nottingham Trent University, UK These are difficult times that interrogate public sociology in many ways. The spread of COVID-19 has magnified disparities and inequalities within societies. It has emphasized the role of the public over private interests, and yet the logic of profit that has penetrated deeply into different […]

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Social Distancing: The Relevance of Sociology

by Syed Farid Alatas, National University of Singapore The topic is an excuse to introduce the reader to sociology. However, as a reward for indulging me, I will eventually address the topic of social distancing, only to claim, however, that it is a misnomer. But we need to know what sociology is in order to […]

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A Pioneer of Modern Indian Sociology

by Mir Suheel Rasool, University of Kashmir, India Yogendra Singh (1932-2020) was one of the eminent sociologists of postcolonial India. Singh was a towering figure in intellectual and academic circles for having done pioneering work in Indian sociology on concepts such as social stratification, social change/continuity, Indian sociology, modernization, and cultural change. His writings cover […]

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On the Urgency of (Re)Integrating with the Radical

by S.A. Hamed Hosseini, University of Newcastle, Australia COVID-19 has shown that radical transformations are not only possible but unavoidable to prevent greater implosions. Living through a slow- or de-growth status – where collective “well-living” is gaining primacy over hedonistic well-being – has awakened us to the implausibility of returning to the old normal. Now […]

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Beyond “Koyaanisqatsi”: Reimagining Civilization

by Barry Gills, University of Helsinki, Finland There is an emerging view in the present crisis, illustrated in recently burgeoning commentary across the globe, expressing a realization that our present form of world order and civilization has brought humanity and “nature” into a great crisis, and that we must act radically to transform the foundations. […]

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Rastafari and West Indian Reinvention

by Scott Timcke, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago, and Shelene Gomes, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago and member of ISA Research Committee on Sociology of Migration (RC31) The 1930 coronation of Ras Tafari Mekonnen as His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I was, in part, […]

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Sri Lankan Sociology in Global and Local Contexts

by Siri Hettige, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and member of ISA Research Committees on Sociology of Education (RC04), Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy (RC19), and Sociology of Youth (RC34) As is well known, many non-western societies came under western colonial domination starting in the early sixteenth century. Sri Lanka, previously known as Ceylon, […]

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Sri Lankan Sociology – A Glance Across Time

by Subhangi M.K. Herath, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka The development of Sri Lankan sociology obviously does not follow a clear-cut tradition in sociology unlike that practiced in Europe or America. It is a high blend of sociology and anthropology, with a significant skewing towards anthropology. Two reasons for this are obvious: One is that […]

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Reflecting on Peace, Conflict, and Violence

by Kalinga Tudor Silva, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka Sri Lankan sociology began with ethnographic and historical approaches to understanding a stable and largely peaceful society by local and international researchers during the 1960s. These studies tried to unravel the underlying principles shaping durable institutions like kinship, land tenure, religion, and caste. Almost taken by […]

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Analyzing Violence: Sri Lankan State Formation

by Farzana Haniffa, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka July 1983 has now become a pivotal date in Sri Lanka that many look back on as signaling the beginning of the ethnic conflict. It is seen as the point that exemplifies the breakdown of relations between a mostly Sinhala southern government and Sri Lanka’s Tamils, and the […]

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Blurred Boundaries: Anthropology and Sociology in Sri Lanka

by Premakumara de Silva, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka, and member of ISA Research Committee on Sociology of Religion (RC22) Sri Lanka has a long tradition of sociological and anthropological inquiry, which is evident from the extensive work done by both foreign and Sri Lankan sociologists and anthropologists on aspects of Sri Lankan society and […]

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Globalization and Dependency: The Plastic Waste Issue in China

by Pinar Temocin, Hiroshima University, Japan Globalization can be seen as an integral process where transformation takes place in the social, cultural, and economic spheres of society. It affects both developed and developing regions and nations from micro to macro level. Globalization has brought significant changes through posing challenges to our lives. The environment has […]

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