GD9.3, December 2019

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Editorial of Global Dialogue 9.3

In countries of the Global North and South alike debates around climate change and the ecological crisis have come to the fore in recent years. In an interview, Qingzhi Huan, professor of comparative politics in Beijing, China and a proponent of eco-socialist policies, gives insights into the Chinese debates and how environmental policies and approaches […]

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For an Eco-Socialist Vision: An Interview with Qingzhi Huan

Qingzhi Huan is professor of comparative politics at Peking University in China. In 2002-3 he was a Harvard-Yenching Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, USA and in 2005-6 Humboldt Research Fellow at the University of Mannheim in Germany. His research focusses on environmental politics, European politics as well as left politics. He authored and edited a […]

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75 Years of The Great Transformation

by Brigitte Aulenbacher, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02), Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy (RC19), Sociology of Work (RC30), and Women, Gender and Society (RC32) and Andreas Novy, Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU), Austria The Great Transformation (TGT), the magnum opus of […]

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Polanyi’s The Great Transformation at Seventy-Five

by Fred Block, University of California, Davis, USA and Margaret R. Somers, University of Michigan, USA When Karl Polanyi died in 1964, his intellectual contributions were not well known except among economic anthropologists and scholars of Greek and Roman antiquity. As a refugee intellectual, Polanyi had divided his life across four separate countries – Austria, […]

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The Market as Statecraft: A Polanyian Reading

by Antonino Palumbo, Palermo University, Italy and Alan Scott, University of New England, Australia and member of ISA Research Committee on Sociology of Urban and Regional Development (RC21) With the exception of (orthodox) economics, social scientists – and in particular sociologists and social anthropologists – have long agreed that the pure competitive market is not […]

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Polanyi, Accounting, and ‘Beyond GDP’

by Gareth Dale, Brunel University London, UK When debating Ludwig von Mises on the question of socialist accountancy, Karl Polanyi made the following remark. “Accounting is a quantitative overview of economic activity. The capitalist economy, for example, revolves around profit, so its accounting provides an overview of the relationship of each element of capital to […]

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Great Transformations: Marketizing East Asia

by Jonathan D. London, Leiden University, The Netherlands The world-scale expansion and deepening of markets and market relations rank among the most transformative developments of our times. We can refer to these processes by way of a generic if inelegant neologism – marketization. Accelerated processes of marketization that have taken hold globally in recent decades […]

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The Fear of Population Replacement

by Attila Melegh, Founding Director at Karl Polanyi Center of Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary East European populations are (again) in the process of understanding the insights of their son, Karl Polanyi. After writing The Great Transformation and explaining why market utopia leads to the need to regain a “protective cover” against systems of “crude […]

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The Road to Populism

by Chris Hann, Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology, Germany The pendant to Karl Polanyi’s The Great Transformation, published one month earlier in March 1944 in London, is Friedrich Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom. Neither can be classified as a work of professional sociology or social science. These are popular books by scholars aiming to […]

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The Enduring Legacy of Karl Polanyi

by Andreas Novy, Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU), Austria After his death in 1964, Karl Polanyi was mainly known in anthropology, being a fierce defender of a more contextualized understanding of the economics as the “organizing of livelihood.” His rediscovery as a social scientist in a broad range of disciplines took place from […]

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Ann Barden Denis: In Appreciation

by Linda Christiansen-Ruffman, Saint Mary’s University, Angela Miles, University of Toronto, and Marilyn Porter, Memorial University, Canada On February 5, 2019, Ann Barden Denis passed away suddenly from cardiac arrest. She was only 73. Ann committed much of her life to sociology, to interdisciplinary scholarship, to equality in society, and to respectful social relationships across […]

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Migration, On the Move

by Karin Scherschel, RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, Germany The dynamics of migration and flight are, simply put, the result of an inequitable global distribution of social, economic, cultural, and political rights. We would not reflect on or talk about migration if the modern globalized world was not divided through borders into nation-states. The political […]

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European Imaginations and African Mobility Realities

by Gerda Heck, The American University in Cairo, Egypt During a summit of African leaders hosted by German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin in October 2018, she introduced a new 1 billion euros development fund to tackle unemployment in Africa, a problem she said is spurring the “mass migration” from Africa to Europe. This points […]

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The Central American Caravan: A 21st-Century Exodus

by Carlos Sandoval, University of Costa Rica, Costa Rica Since October 2018, great international attention has been paid to the collective flight of Central Americans from their home countries, especially from Honduras and El Salvador. This so-called “caravan” of migrants moved first through Guatemala and then Mexico and many were, in June 2019, waiting hopefully […]

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Refugees as Unfree Labor Force: Notes from Turkey

by Bediz Yılmaz, IMIS-University of Osnabrück, Germany and Maya Association-Mersin, Turkey With 3.6 million Syrians and another 600,000 from other nationalities, Turkey is by far the country with the largest refugee population in the world. This has become for Turkish authorities a fact to boast about and is applauded by other countries, who talk of […]

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Undoing Borders in Solidarity Cities

by Sarah Schilliger, University of Basel, Switzerland While the leaders of the EU member states are pushing ahead with migration policy restrictions, accepting the death of thousands of people in the Mediterranean Sea and criminalizing those who rescue refugees in distress, municipal governments of various European cities are declaring their cities “Solidarity Cities.” Cities have […]

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Students for Future: Towards Ecological Class Politics

by Julia Kaiser, University of Leipzig, Germany and Jasper Stange, Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany How will our world look in a century? According to recent studies, the majority of the global population will be subjected to heat conditions beyond human survivability for several weeks per year. Aridification will affect more than 30% of the […]

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Private Catholic Education in Senegal

by Moustapha Tamba, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal Private Catholic education remains prominent today in Senegal. In 1816, the colonial administration entrusted the teaching of French to the Church, in particular to congregations such as the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny, the Brothers of Ploërmel, the Missionaries of the Holy Spirit, the Sisters […]

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Sociology of the Senegalese School System

by Souleymane Gomis, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal Reflecting on the sociological dimension of the Senegalese education system is an opportunity for a comprehensive and systematic analysis. The aim is to show the strengths and weaknesses of its structure and functioning from the colonial era to the present day and to identify its […]

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Strategic Adjustments in Franco-Arab Education in Senegal

by El Hadji Malick Sy Camara, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal With the introduction of Islam, an increasing number of households across Senegal have become familiar with the Arabic language. Indeed, Arabic is of paramount importance to the population, of which 95% is Muslim. The Arabic language appears to be highly valued among […]

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Secular Private Education in Senegal

by Samba Diouf, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal Education systems in countries of the Global South bear the double mark of traditional structures and of the colonizer. The model exported from Europe was certainly not introduced on virgin territory in Africa. It has always been appropriated in a unique way, both by those […]

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Socio-Anthropology of Religious Leadership in Senegal

by Mouhamed Moustapha Dieye, Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar, Senegal The legacy of religious leadership From early on, Senegal was a hub in the various exchanges between Europe, Africa, and America, which, to some extent, explains the openness of Senegalese people, their sense of hospitality and tolerance between Muslims and Christians. Their socio-cultural values […]

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Making Women’s Rights a Part of Everyday Life

by Bengi Sullu, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, USA[1] The 63rd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW63), with the priority theme “Social protection systems, access to public services and sustainable infrastructure for gender equality and empowerment of women and girls,” was held at the UN Headquarters in New […]

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