Volume 8, Issue 1

Global Dialogue

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Editorial

“If the standpoint of economics is the market and its expansion, and the standpoint of political science is the state and the guarantee of political stability, then the standpoint of sociology is civil society and the defense of the social. In times of market tyranny and state despotism, sociology – and in particular its public […]

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On Capital-Imperialism: An Interview with Virgínia Fontes

Virgínia Fontes is one of today’s most distinguished Marxist thinkers in Latin America. She was Professor of Social History at the Fluminense Federal University (UFF) and Senior Researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In her book Reflexões im-pertinentes: História e capitalismo contemporâneo published in 2005, she examined the development […]

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Power, Violence, and Justice

by Margaret Abraham, Hofstra University, USA, ISA President and Program Committee Chair of the XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology It is hard to imagine that we are just a few months away from the XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology in Toronto, Canada. Since the start of the discipline, sociologists have been preoccupied with […]

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Canadian Sociology and the World Congress

by Rima Wilkes, University of British Columbia, President of the Canadian Sociological Association, Vice-President for ISA World Congress Program Coordination of ISA Research Committee on Logic and Method (RC33) and member of the Local Organizing Committee of the XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology Canadian sociologists and members of the Canadian Sociological Association (http://www.csa-scs.ca/) are […]

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An Opportunity to Commit Sociology, Together, in Canada

by Patrizia Albanese, Ryerson University, Canada and Chair of the Local Organizing Committee of the XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology On July 1, 2017, Canada celebrated its sesquicentennial. For the entire year, Canadians were encouraged to make merry of the fact that they were Canadian and living in what by many measures – GDP, […]

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Canadian Universities, Between Domesticity and Globality

by François Lachapelle and Patrick John Burnett, University of British Columbia, Canada In recent years, global university rankings have praised the international outlook of Canada’s top research universities while top schools in the country have proudly announced their worldwide quest to hire the best qualified candidates. Following recent political instabilities in the US and the […]

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The Effects of Student Debt on New Canadian Graduates

by Mitchell McIvor, University of Toronto, Canada In many nations, post-secondary education has become synonymous with labor market prosperity and higher education has been hailed as the great equalizer in class mobility. While higher education is as important as ever to prosperity, however, rising tuition rates have led to an exponential increase in student debt. […]

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Becoming a Citizen Scientist

by Mickey Vallee, Athabasca University, Canada When I’m stuck in my writing, I go for a hike. I live in a remote area of Canada, within walking distance from creeks, rivers, mountains, and wildlife. I like to listen to birds on these hikes. Red-winged black birds, nightjars, ravens, crows, and yellow warblers fire their calls […]

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Identity Work and Political Leaders in Canada

by Elise Maiolino, University of Toronto, Canada The political climate of the last five years has been a fitting time to study identity politicking and new candidacies in Canadian politics. During this period, three of Canada’s most notable politicians, running for three of the county’s most notable political offices, were involved in electoral scenarios that […]

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Do Immigrants Gain Trust in High Trust Canada?

by Cary Wu, University of British Columbia, Canada Trust reflects a person’s perception of goodwill and benign intent from others. People trusting each other is essential not only for individual well-being, but also for social cohesion, economic growth, and democracy. Trust is especially important for immigrants and for societies with large foreign-born populations due to […]

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Intersectionality, Indigeneity, Gender, and Violence

by Maggie Walter, Pro Vice-Chancellor of Aboriginal Research and Leadership at the University of Tasmania, Joselynn Baltra-Ulloa, University of Tasmania and Jacob Prehn, Office of the Pro Vice-Chancellor Aboriginal Research and Leadership, University of Tasmania, Australia The gendered violence statistics relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia make for grim reading. Nationally, […]

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Sexual Violence and “Corrective Rape” in South Africa

by Kammila Naidoo, University of Johannesburg, South Africa and member of ISA Research Committees on Women in Society (RC32), Biography and Society (RC38), and Clinical Sociology (RC46) Remembering Khwezi’s Story In 2005, a lesbian woman, Fezekile Ntsukela Kuzwayo (best known by her pseudonym, Khwezi), accused Jacob Zuma, the man who was later to become South […]

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Making Domestic Violence Visible in Poland

by Magdalena Grzyb, Jagiellonian University, Poland The Piasecki case The Polish public was outraged when, in April 2017, a recording was published on YouTube by the wife of a local politician of the ruling Law and Justice Party. The recording showed one incident of the domestic abuse that the politician from Bydgoszcz, Rafał Piasecki, had […]

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Towards Zero Violence?

by Sylvia Walby, UNESCO Chair of Gender Research, Lancaster University, UK, board member and former President (2006-2010) of ISA Research Committee on Economy and Society (RC02) The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for 2030 include Target 16.1: “significantly reduce all forms of violence and related death rates” and 5.2: “end all forms of violence against […]

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200 Years of Marx

In some parts of the world the 2008/9 crisis of finance already sparked renewed interest in the oeuvre of Karl Marx and his congenial partner Friedrich Engels. In particular, The Capital seemed to be custom-made to understand and explain the crisis-ridden development of capitalism and shed light on the contemporary capitalist economy and its effects […]

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Marx and Sociology, 2018

by G.M. Tamás, Department of Sociology, Central European University, Hungary Max Weber in his General Economic History (1919-20) established that capitalism as a comprehensive system of satisfying everyday human needs was specific to the West, that its preconditions were rational calculation of capital (customarily, double-entry bookkeeping) as a norm in the case of all greater […]

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The Continuing Relevance of the Marxist Tradition for Transcending Capitalism

by Erik Olin Wright, University of Wisconsin–Madison, USA No idea is more closely associated with the work of Marx than the claim that the intrinsic dynamics of capitalism contain deep contradictions that ultimately lead to its self-destruction, and what is more, that these dynamics simultaneously create conditions favorable to the creation of an alternative form […]

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Feminism Confronts Marxism

by Alexandra Scheele, University of Bielefeld, Germany and Stefanie Wöhl, University of Applied Sciences BFI Vienna, Austria For several years now, the media in Germany and elsewhere have talked of a “Marx renaissance,” meaning that the work of Karl Marx might have been right in analyzing capitalism and financial crises. This is often explained by […]

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Marx and the State

by Bob Jessop, Lancaster University, UK Marx did not write a comprehensive critique of the state as an organ of class domination and the exercise of state power as a political process. Moreover, although his project was as much political as theoretical, he provided no extended or coherent analyses of topics such as political parties […]

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Capitalist Landnahme: A New Marxist Approach to Law

by , Rio de Janeiro State University (UERJ), Brazil Marxism and law Much of what we know about the Marxist notion of law is rooted in Evgeny B. Pashukanis’ critique of legal form. Its starting point is Marx’s argument that in capitalist society sociability acquires the form of value, implying that concrete labor is realized […]

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Marx and Sociology in India

by Satish Deshpande, University of Delhi, India Since roughly the middle of the twentieth century, it is only in the Anglo-American West that academic Marxism has loomed larger than political Marxism. In most of the world (and not just Eastern Europe or the former Soviet Union), Marxism has been far more important as a political […]

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Marx in the Twenty-First Century

by Michelle Williams, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa, and member of ISA Research Committees on Economy and Society (RC02) and Labor Movements (RC44) Marx’s ideas about the emancipatory and oppressive dimensions of capitalism have inspired scholars, politicos, and activists across the globe for over 150 years and have led to an entire intellectual tradition […]

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Marx and the Global South

by Raju Das, York University, Canada and David Fasenfest, Wayne State University, USA, treasurer of ISA Committee on Economy and Society (RC02) Karl Marx lived in Europe 150 years ago, where he engaged in politics and wrote about Europe. Of the thousands of pages that he wrote, scholars have calculated that only about 400 pages […]

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Class Inequalities and Social Struggles in China

by Jenny Chan, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, and member of ISA Research Committee on Labor Movements (RC44) On the night of November 18, 2017, a fire on the southern outskirts of Beijing took nineteen lives, eight of them children. The two-story building, with a basement, was divided into tiny rooms and cramped with tenants […]

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A Comparative Study of Public and Private Universities in India

by Niharika Jaiswal, New Delhi, India In India with the advent of neoliberal policies, the growth of knowledge economies, and the inclusion of private education providers, global networks and the private sector are empowered to dictate what qualifies as “relevant knowledge.” The idea of education as a “public good” is replaced by the idea of […]

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