Volume 9, Issue 1

At the XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology in Toronto, Canada, this past July, Sari Hanafi was elected as the new President of the International Sociological Association. This first 2019 issue of Global Dialogue opens with Hanafi’s theoretical vision for the ISA in the course of his term. Here he argues for combining postcolonial and […]

by Sari Hanafi, American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and President of the International Sociological Association (2018-2022) I was honored to be elected as the President of the International Sociological Association (ISA) during its congress in July 2018 in Toronto. In the following paragraphs I would like to outline the program that I introduced in my […]

by Projekt Klassenanalyse Jena (PKJ), University of Jena, Germany Why we need class theory– PKJ looking for companions We are currently confronted with intensifying social inequalities and increasing social protests around the globe, while the global economy is still prone to crisis. This applies even to the capitalist centers. According to official statistics, 19% of […]

by Pablo Pérez, Centre for Social Conflict and Cohesion Studies and Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Chile and Rodolfo Elbert, CONICET and Instituto de Investigaciones Gino Germani, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina and member of ISA Research Committee on Labour Movements (RC44) Latin American scholars have attempted to bury the concept of class many times in recent […]

by Svetlana Yaroshenko, St. Petersburg State University, Russia I began researching poverty in Russia in the early 1990s, when liberal market reforms were implemented. Poverty was regarded as the cost of the radical societal transformation during the transition from the Soviet distributive system to the capitalist system. It was assumed that the introduction of the […]

by Ngai-Ling Sum, Lancaster University, UK Marx and Engels used the term Lumpenproletariat in mainly descriptive, pejorative, and rhetorical ways. The “underclass” occupies a similar place in recent economic and political discourse, while the “precariat” has a more positive connotation. This paper employs Gramsci’s notion of the “subaltern” or “subordinate” classes, which aimed to capture […]

by Tania Murray Li, University of Toronto, Canada Who owns what? Who does what? Who gets what? What do they do with the surplus? These four questions, concisely posed by agrarian scholar Henry Bernstein, offer a useful starting point for the analysis of rural class formation. The questions work especially well in places where ownership […]

by Ruth Patrick, University of York, UK Over the past 35 years, the UK’s social security system has been subject to wave after wave of reform. Changes have been implemented as part of efforts to end what politicians so often describe as “a culture of welfare dependency” and an ever greater role has been found […]

by Richard York, University of Oregon, USA and Brett Clark, University of Utah, USA Capitalism is a system predicated on the endless pursuit of accumulation by and for the capitalist class. The capitalist system accomplishes this goal through rampant expropriation and exploitation, inevitably generating environmental degradation and social inequalities. Expropriation – a process of robbery […]

by James K. Galbraith, University of Texas, USA, and Klaus Dörre, University of Jena, Germany The economies of early industrialized countries have left the time of rapid growth behind. One of the reasons for this end of rapid economic growth in these countries is a trend towards tightened profits that James Galbraith has called “the […]