United Kingdom

by Daniel Clegg, University of Edinburgh, UK The provision of replacement incomes to adults who are physically capable of work has always been among the most controversial questions in social policy. Intended to protect against income loss due to involuntary exclusion from paid work, unemployment benefits have long been criticized by some as a subsidy […]

by Srujana Katta, Kelle Howson, and Mark Graham, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, UK Ola Cabs, the Indian ride-sharing firm, is one of an increasing number of companies around the world whose business model relies on using a digital platform to match the supply and demand for labor. Specifically, Ola’s mobile application allows passengers […]

by Gareth Dale, Brunel University London, UK When debating Ludwig von Mises on the question of socialist accountancy, Karl Polanyi made the following remark. “Accounting is a quantitative overview of economic activity. The capitalist economy, for example, revolves around profit, so its accounting provides an overview of the relationship of each element of capital to […]

by Matt Dawson, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom “So, what’s the alternative?” I can’t be the only sociologist to be asked what alternatives sociology has to offer to the social problems it so carefully catalogues. It was partly this questioning, and my occasional inability to answer it, that encouraged me to write Social Theory for […]

by Nicola Piper, Queen Mary University of London, UK and member of ISA Research Committee on Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy (RC19) Asia is home to significant “South-South” or intra-regional migration. According to estimates by the International Labour Organization, there were 150.3 million migrant workers in 2013 of whom 83.7 million were men, and […]

by Jeff Hearn, Hanken School of Economics, Finland, Örebro University, Sweden, and University of Huddersfield, UK, and member of ISA Research Committee on Women, Gender, and Society (RC32) The International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP, https://www.ipsp.org/) was conceived around 2012 and early 2013, as a large independent non-governmental social science operation, paralleling in some ways […]

by Ngai-Ling Sum, Lancaster University, UK Marx and Engels used the term Lumpenproletariat in mainly descriptive, pejorative, and rhetorical ways. The “underclass” occupies a similar place in recent economic and political discourse, while the “precariat” has a more positive connotation. This paper employs Gramsci’s notion of the “subaltern” or “subordinate” classes, which aimed to capture […]

by Ruth Patrick, University of York, UK Over the past 35 years, the UK’s social security system has been subject to wave after wave of reform. Changes have been implemented as part of efforts to end what politicians so often describe as “a culture of welfare dependency” and an ever greater role has been found […]

by Christian Fuchs, University of Westminster, United Kingdom Far-right politics has in recent years expanded and consolidated its power. We have Donald Trump (Republican Party) in the USA, Viktor Orbán (Fidesz) in Hungary, Heinz-Christian Strache (Freedom Party) in Austria, Geert Wilders (Party for Freedom) in the Netherlands, Narendra Modi (Bharatiya Janata Party) in India, Recep […]

by Jan Czarzasty, and Juliusz Gardawski, Warsaw School of Economics, Poland, Adam Mrozowicki, University of Wrocław, Poland and member of ISA Research Committee on Labor Movements (RC44), and Vera Trappmann, Leeds University Business School, United Kingdom There is plenty of evidence that the younger generation across Europe experiences increasing uncertainty in their lives, stemming from […]